Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /www/htdocs/w009437f/wp-content/plugins/wpseo/wpseo.php on line 12

Dezember 2008



Sam Hopkins: Slum TV


4. Dezember 2008, 20:24 Uhr

(Bild entfernt)

After a year of existence and more than two years since the idea was born, Slum TV has really gained momentum and become more established. This is very exciting. Almost every week, I see the members developing their abilities, I see the stories getting better and I see our resources expand.

However, at the same time as this growth is occurring, I find it increasingly hard to talk about the project. This is not due to me losing faith in the idea, but because the context I am presenting it in is mainly that of pitching the idea to funders. And these discussions invariably revolve around the same key themes; ‘empowerment of the youth’, ‘job creation in the urban slums’ and ‘giving a voice to the voiceless’. These are admirable goals but I am tired of reducing the project to these specific terms.

So this is either a warning or maybe a disclaimer, or perhaps an excuse. In this article I am not going to sell the project, I am not going to tell you why it is so important and I am not going to try and convince you. Actually, I am going to do the opposite and talk about some of the challenges that we have to negotiate. This is a process, and processes involve encountering and negotiating challenges. What I hope to do here is look at how the recent political crisis affected the role of Slum TV, reflect on what impact my position as local coordinator has had, and briefly address the dynamic of my relationship with the participants.

The beginning of 2008 was a very unstable period in Kenya. The recent election results had been contested by the opposition and the country seemed to be descending into the worst inter-ethnic violence that it had experienced since independence. From the perspective of Slum TV this was a context that forced us to address what we were really trying to do. From being a small grassroots media initiative, focusing on local concerns, we were suddenly located in the middle of the biggest story in the international press. Mathare, where we are based, saw some of the worst violence in Kenya.

Thus we were faced with a dilemma. On the one hand, we were perfectly placed to get footage and material that would be simply impossible for other journalists, and thus tell a more full story of what was happening. On the other hand, every other journalist in Kenya was focusing on the violence, and the stories of solidarity and assistance between different ethnic groups were not being told.

We make our decisions on a consensus basis and had several meetings during this stage. From the very beginning, almost all the members were adamant about representing the stories that were not being represented. Again and again members talked about ‘telling the other half of the story’. So this is what we set out to do. Although we could not hold screenings until April (public gatherings had been banned by the government) the members set about covering stories, which moved beyond the ‘machete-wielding native’ cliché, and looked at the courage and mutual assistance of everyday people in the slums.

The result of this was our ‘Peace Newsreel’, which we screened on Friday May 25th containing stories such as Mr. Onyango’s Neighbors

about an old resident of Mathare who refused to leave an ethnically mixed area where neighbors no longer trusted one another and Tell tale for Peace about a workshop in which young men who were swept up in the violence tried to address why this happened. Almost all the stories focused on issues of solidarity and grassroots efforts to heal rifts within the community, as had been the decision taken by the members. I had only been there to help them achieve what they decided… or had I?

One of my key criteria for running the project has always been to be as ‘invisible’ as possible. I see my role as that of a facilitator, someone who is there to make things possible for the members; to train and offer assistance but not to manage or direct. However, the very real danger of death for these young men and women if they got caught in the wrong place made me critically re-evaluate this position. Being older than the participants (they are predominantly in their early 20’s) and actually being an initiator meant that I was in a very real position of responsibility. If the consensus of the group had been to go and cover the troubles, to get as close to the action as possible, would I have been comfortable? Would I have been placing the members in danger? On the other hand, the members are all adults, and in fact, a couple of them did go and cover the clashes and got exclusive material which earned them a lot of money from foreign news bureaus.

(Bild entfernt)

Strongly related to this issue of responsibility is, of course, an issue of power relations. How ‘free’ are the decisions of the participants here? To what extent am I unwittingly influencing the outcome of the meetings? The fact that the consensus of the members was to cover the ‘positive’ stories to some extent concerned me. Being honest, this is the outcome I would have preferred. I began to wonder if I had, subconsciously, manipulated the participants into this decision. Yet I felt that I had been scrupulously careful to be impartial in meetings, to try and represent the pros and cons of both approaches and to not let my feelings be known. However, humans are perceptive and I cannot rule out the possibility that I affected the decision of the group. On the other hand, would a whole group of young, free thinking men and women have their opinions swayed by the unexpressed thoughts of the coordinator?

I do not really have an answer to this. My approach is to be aware that this could be the case, to be as sensitive as possible and also to accept that absolute impartiality as probably impossible. Also, although the members are quite ‘vulnerable’ in this situation, and could be the victims of an unbalanced power relationship, I think it is also slightly patronizing to expect self-exploitation from them. These issues of exploitation are intrinsic to many artist-led participatory projects but I think it is important to at least the consider the thought that participants have an agenda as well. Perhaps these endeavors are not so much collaborations as alliances, where both parties have a certain amount of agency for decision and change making.

Another good illustration of how this ‘non-influential facilitator’ role has been compromised is the context of the present newsreel. However, whilst in this previous example my impartiality, if at all, had been subconscious, here it was a very conscious decision. The newsreel has the theme of DIY culture. This is not a theme that the members chose, but one that they have responded to. However, one of our main criteria at the outset of the project was not to define content. Within the development context, most participatory media initiatives stipulate what the projects should be about e.g. HIV, Gender mainstreaming, Water, Sanitation. We wanted to distance ourselves from these ‘NGO aesthetics” and to give the members proper creative input into the content. Yet, here we are providing a theme. Are we not acting in the same way as the NGO’s that we scorned?

DIY culture is such a broad theme and encompasses so many facets of life in Mathare, from home-brewed alcohol to pirate cinemas to shoes made from old tires, that it does not really restrict what the members want to work on. Secondly, a critical difference between DIY culture and issues such as HIV and Water is that this has a positive feel to it and highlights the resourcefulness and ingenuity of people in the slum, as opposed to documenting the plight of HIV patients and the pollution of the water.

But perhaps these differences are cosmetic and the key issue is that of methodology; that we had somehow restricted the content. I think this is a valid criticism, and responding to this I should start by first stating that this was a very practical decision. We are short of funds, and that really affects the motivation of the members as we can barely pay them. We received a commission to make a series of short films about DIY culture and it seemed a good solution. This way we would be able to carry on production and pay the members a good fee. And again, returning to this issue of the agency of the participants, I think there would have been a sense of reluctance if they had not been keen. This was not the case at all and this newsreel has generated the most content so far!

(Bild entfernt)

So, whether it is subconscious or conscious, implicit or explicit, I think the role of a coordinator in a project like this is always going to face issues of power, manipulation and exploitation. These are unavoidable and have to be negotiated in relation to criteria that you, as initiators, establish. At the same time, being a work in progress, some situations cannot be anticipated and these criteria may have to be reformed in response to changes in the context. Pragmatism, rather than a compromise should be seen as a very useful tool for process-based work.

I also feel these issues of exploitation are particularly prevalent at the initial stages of participatory work. As I begin to slowly withdraw from my capacity as initiator, a process that I anticipate will take place over the next two years; the level of the engagement of the members will hopefully increase to fill this absence. Following this logic, perhaps participation can only be fully achieved when I have actually stepped out of the project. Until then, I hope I can continue as I have until now; making some progress, encountering problems, finding solutions, some of which work, some of which do not. For those new problematic situations, we try new approaches, see if these work, and so on. It is a bit like walking backwards through a landscape, things become clear only as you progress, and occasionally you trip on an unanticipated patch of uneven ground. But so far we have managed to carry on going forward, and the landscape that is revealed has been worth the occasional stumble.

Sam Hopkins Bericht “Slum TV” erschien zuerst unter dem Titel “Working Title” anlässlich einer Vortragsreise, die Sam Hopkins zusammen mit den beiden Künstlern Alexander Nikolic und Lukas Pusch letzten Sommer nach Belgrad und Novi Sad unternahm.

Sam Hopkins, geboren 1979 in Nairobi, ist Ambassador des IIPM für Ostafrika. Nach einem Studium der spanischen Literatur, der marxistischen Philosophie und der Geschichtswissenschaften in Edinburgh und Havana vervollständigte er sein ünstlerisches Curriculum in Oxford (MA Social Sculpture) und an der Bauhaus Universität Weimar (MFA Public Art Strategies). Nach zahlreichen Ausstellungen in aller Welt rief er gemeinsam mit Alexander Nikolic und Lukas Pusch im Sommer 2007 das Projekt Slum TV ins Leben. Zusammen mit 14 Bewohnern aus Mathare, Nairobis größtem Slum, produziert er seither in schneller Folge und für ein wachsendes internationales Publikum Reportagen und eine beliebte Sitcom. Das Team von Slum TV war zuletzt Ende November im Rahmenprogramm des “Festivals für Politik im Freien Theater” in Europa zu Gast.

Neben seiner Tätigkeit als Ambassador und Public Artist ist Sam Hopkins als Vortragsreisender und Ünstler auch in Deutschland präsent – im Jahr 2008 unter anderem als artist in residence in der Orangerie Gera (”A kind of ambiguity”) oder auf dem Oxford-Bonn Festival (”Sind Sie Mein Doppelgänger?”).

Die ersten beiden dem Text beigegebenen Bilder zeigen Mathare während der Unruhen und des darauf folgenden Belagerungszustands im Sommer 2007. (Unruhen, die sich nur als Vorboten für die umfassende Gewalt des Jahrs 2008 herausstellen sollten.) Das dritte zeigt eine öffentliche Ausstrahlung von “Slum-TV” im Zentrum von Mathare.

Auf slum-tv.info heisst es zu den Ereignissen im Sommer 2007: “Bei einer Polizeiaktion wurden an drei Tagen mindestens 39 Menschen erschossen und 250 verhaftet. Laut Zeugenaussagen und Zeitungsberichten wurden viele durch Kopf- und Rückenschüsse hingerichtet. Bei den Liquidationen dürfte es sich um eine Racheaktion der Polizei gehandelt haben, nachdem zuvor zwei Beamte erschossen und vier Zivilisten von der für ihre Brutalität bekannten Mungki-Gang geköpft worden waren.

Ein Großteil des Blutbades spielte sich in einem Viertel Mathares namens Kosovo ab. Einen Steinwurf entfernt organisierten wir in einer kleinen Bibliothek der Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) einen Videoworkshop für unser Slum-TV Projekt…”

http://samhopkins.org

  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • MisterWong
  • Technorati
  • email
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • Twitter
  • Yigg

Chronik | kein Kommentar »



vistit IIPM



Rolf Bossart: Die Banken müssen untergehen, damit sie das Leben in Fülle haben


3. Dezember 2008, 12:22 Uhr

(Bild entfernt)

So musste es kommen, irgendeinmal. Der Kapitalismus geht unter, und die Linke, die zwei Jahrhunderte lang darauf hin gearbeitet hat, nimmt es nicht zur Kenntnis, erinnert sich lieber an den 200jährigen Spinner Wilhelm Weitling, der vor 150 Jahren erkannt hat: „Du musst sterben, wenn du kein Geld hast, und um welches zu erhalten, musst du dich den Bedingungen fügen, welche die setzen, die das Geld haben.“ Die Ausrufung des Endes des bisherigen Kapitalismus auf alle erdenkliche Arten müssen FAZ, NZZ, Süddeutsche und ihre Gratisbrüder und -schwestern im Geiste übernehmen. Wie recht sie doch haben müssen, die alten Untergeher, die sich alles grenzenlos Ausgewachsene und untrennbar Verwirrte nicht anders als in Hinsicht auf das Ende vorstellen können.

Und doch ist der Untergang des Kapitalismus in den letzten Wochen mit einer Intensität vorgetragen worden, die neben der üblichen Lust der Rechten, den Fortgang der eigenen Sauereien als bereits untergegangenes Kulturgut zu geniessen, noch ein anderes Motiv vermuten lässt. Eine schlichte Formel, deren sicher ebenso schlichten Urheber ich leider vergessen habe, trifft das Motiv der vereinigten Leitartikler und Wirtschaftsredaktoren für ihre drastischen Drohworte gegen das Kapital: „Wenn wir wollen, dass alles so bleibt, wie es ist, muss sich alles ändern.“

Die Formel, so oft sie auch in den letzten Jahrzehnten zur Erklärung der „schöpferischen Zerstörung“ des Kapitalismus beigezogen wurde, bedeutete nie etwas anderes, als dass man die Leute glauben machen muss, dass sich alles ändert, indem man permanent das Verschwinden und den Untergang des noch Bestehenden, aber herrschaftstechnisch nicht mehr Erwünschten kulturkritisch beklagt. Und sie erweist sich jetzt als gnadenreicher Trick zur medialen Bewältigung der Finanzkrise. Indem man plötzlich den Untergang des herrschaftstechnisch immer noch Erwünschten beklagt, erzielt man das Einverständnis der über Jahrzehnte im Feuilleton kulturkritisch Eingestimmten, denen das blosse Wort vom Verschwundenen mittlerweile gleichviel gilt wie den vorkonziliaren Christen das Paradies, ein Ort nämlich, der allen in die Kinderstube schien und wo man aber nun nur heimlich immer noch hin will.

(Bild entfernt)

Hat man dem Bürgertum, also allen kleinen und mittleren Aktionären, den fortbestehenden Kapitalismus oder namentlich seine Wertpapiere einmal solcherart im Kopf verdreht, dass die einen glauben, nicht mehr zu haben, was sie noch besitzen und die anderen nicht mehr wollen, was sie doch behalten, dann hat man den Kapitalismus erfolgreich geistig verdrängt, virtuell gezähmt, idealistisch totgemacht wie damals in Deutschland die französische Revolution. Man hat der Lust des Volkes am Untergang statt gegeben, schliesslich die realen Geldverluste an der Börse umfunktioniert in den virtuellen Verlust des fort wuchernden Systems und gleichzeitig mit Staatsgeldern die Verluste real kompensiert.

Wie die Propheten des alten Israel den Untergang dessen predigten, was sie erhalten wollten, so tun es auch die Propheten des neuen Kapitalismus. Aber die reale Umkehr, die bei den biblischen Propheten noch die Bedingung für die Rettung war, ist bei den Feuilletonisten nur noch eine Umkehr in die ökonomische Romantik, gewollt und befördert aus der am Faschismus abgesehenen Erkenntnis, dass der Ursprungsmythos des funktionstüchtigen und sich selbst regulierenden Kapitalismus nach all den Krisen nur „wiederkehren kann – ungebrochen wie es für ihn notwendig ist – wenn die Gesellschaft, in der er gebrochen ist, untergeht.“ So Paul Tillichs scharfsinnige Analyse der politischen Romantik von 1932 in seinem Buch „Die sozialistische Entscheidung“ – nicht wissend damals in welcher Weise seine politische Vorhersicht gerade nach dem „grossen“ Untergang der Nazis für den kapitalistischen Ursprungsmythos im Deutschen Wirtschaftswunder Gültigkeit haben sollte und jetzt vielleicht für den Finanzmythos der zweiten Moderne.

Die feuilletonistische Behauptung, dass nachher nichts mehr so sein wird wie vorher, reicht aus, dass das tatsächliche Weiterbestehen aller Fundamente des alten Systems über die Krise hinaus, woran dank US-Finanzminister und Investmentbanker Hank Paulson («das Problem sind nicht die faulen Kredite, sondern Marktängste») und nach den bereits wieder gemeldeten Gewinnen von führenden US-Banken, nicht zu zweifeln ist, im Kopf der Bildungsbürger trotzdem als wohlige Melancholie dem Verlorenen gegenüber gespeichert wird. Denn das Bühnenstück, das die Börsianer nochmals mit einem grösseren Schuss Tragik zu umgeben versucht als all die Stücke der Jahre zuvor – von Urs Widmers Top Dogs bis zu den singenden Brokern Christoph Marthalers – und das im Untertitel das Wort „Abgesang“ führen wird, wird sicher diesen Moment irgendwo im deutschen Sprachraum in einen Laptop gehämmert. Und nicht umsonst und nicht zufällig wird gerade jetzt Oswald Spenglers präfaschistischer Kassenschlager aus den 20er Jahren: „Der Untergang des Abendlandes“ in Italien neu aufgelegt und an Symposien diskutiert und erfreut sich auch in Deutschland wieder wachsender Beliebtheit. Und nicht aus Zufall hat man dem Maler Anselm Kiefer, dem „raunenden Beschwörer des Untergangs“ (Tagesanzeiger) in der Frankfurter Paulskirche den Friedenspreis des Deutschen Buchhandels angedreht. „Gestimmtheit ist alles!“ würde der Philosoph Otto von Bollnow selig jetzt sicher gerne rufen.

Und wer von den Financiers es überlebt, geht gereinigt und gestählt aus dem virtuellen Untergang hervor. Denn selbstverständlich stehen viele Banker real jetzt auf der Strasse, gehen jetzt aus Frust ins Puff und nicht mehr um die Hausse zu feiern, müssen ihr Kindermädchen entlassen oder im Gehalt zurückstufen oder sitzen im Therapiezimmer. Aber auch dies ist der normale kapitalistische Vorgang der Zurückstufung einiger Emporkömmlinge, die zeitweilig im System überzählig sind. Wir wollen ihnen trotzdem unser Mitleid zukommen lassen, es soll ihnen die Pausen versüssen zwischen den Assessments, mit denen die Verdrängten sich wohl gegenwärtig um ihre Wiederkehr in die Bankenwelt bemühen.

(Bild entfernt)

Was aber sich tatsächlich geändert hat und wofür die Bankenkrise einst als Geburtshelferin gefeiert werden kann, ist die erfolgreiche Installierung eines gesunden Börsenklimas in den Katalog der demokratischen Grundrechte, gerade so wie es in der niederländischen Zeitung Trouw zu lesen war: „Die Wähler verlangen Arbeit, billige Steuern, ein eigenes Haus, welches ständig im Wert steigt, damit sie ihre Hypotheken nicht abzulösen brauchen. Nun fordern sie auch noch ein gesundes Börsenklima.“ Der grässliche Zynismus, der die hilflosen Begehrlichkeiten der Kleinbürger als Hauptschuldige hinstellt, hat seine Berechtigung darin, dass er nur ausspricht, was seit Jahrzehnten, in der Schweiz namentlich seit der Einführung des Pensionskassenwahnsinns, Plan war: Die Umfunktionierung der Lohnabhängigen in Börsenabhängige, jeder ein Kleinaktionär, jeder über das eigene Pensionskassenguthaben über Gedeih und Verderben ans Spekulieren gebunden.

Sie geht aber auch einher mit der Abkoppelung der Lohnentwicklung vom realen Geschäftsgang und der Gewinnentwicklung. Die Angestellten sind sich bereits gewohnt, die ausbleibenden Teuerungsausgleiche an der Börse wettzumachen und die real verdienten Löhne nur als Teil des Einkommens anzusehen, indem sie Lotto spielen, auf eBay kaufen und verkaufen und ins Casino oder an die Börse gehen. Womit sie, ganz Ich-AG, ihr Verhalten nur demjenigen der grossen Unternehmen angeglichen haben, die ja oft ihr Geld auch eher an der Börse als in der Produktion machen.

Die Aufmerksamkeit, die das Begehren leitet, das wiederum am Ursprung einer politischen Forderung steht, hat sich deshalb bei vielen Lohnabhängigen von den Löhnen wegbewegt, mit verheerenden Folgen. Denn folgt man den Ausführungen des Präsidenten des Schweizerischen Gewerkschaftsbundes Paul Rechsteiner, überhaupt einer der wenigen linken Parlamentarier, die momentan die etwas grösseren Linien noch gerade denken können und wollen, in der WoZ, so steht am Ursprung der gegenwärtigen Krise die Tatsache, „dass die Leute zuwenig verdienen und davon nicht mehr leben können“, weil sie nämlich wie in den USA ihre Häuser nicht mehr halten können, weil sie sich mangels anderer Optionen auf waghalsige Finanzierungen eingelassen haben.

Dass ein gesundes Börsenklima nun zum öffentlich akzeptierten und vom Parlament abgesegneten Kerngeschäft der Sozialpolitik geworden ist, dass das viele Geld, das jetzt überall billig zu haben ist, dahin fliessen soll und nicht in dringend benötigte Infrastruktur-und Sozialprojekte, ist volkswirtschaftlich und sozialpolitisch eine Katastrophe und ein weiterer Sieg, nicht eine Niederlage der Banken und ihrer politischen und feuilletonistischen Beschützer.

Rolf Bossarts Essay “Die Banken müssen untergehen, damit sie das Leben in Fülle haben”, eine Antwort auf Alain Badious Text “Das Reale dieses Krisenspektakels”, erscheint hier erstmals in ungekürzter Form. Der Titel des Essays spielt an auf das bekannte Lied: „Wer leben will wie Gott auf dieser Erde, muss sterben wie ein Weizenkorn, muss sterben, um zu leben“ (Katholisches Kirchengesangbuch Nr. 202, Musik: flämische Volksweise von 1856). Die dem Text beigegebenen Tafelbilder sind Ausschnitte aus Werner Tübkes utopischem Panoramabild “Arbeiterklasse und Intelligenz” (1970-73).

Rolf Bossart, Ambassador des IIPM für die Region Ostschweiz, wurde 1970 in St. Gallen geboren. Studium der Theologie und Geschichtswissenschaft, anschliessend Promotion über die theologische Lesbarkeit der Literatur im 20 Jahrhundert. Rolf Bossart ist Redakteur der Monatsschrift “Neue Wege, Beiträge zu Religion und Sozialismus“ und daneben als Autor bei verschiedenen Zeitungen und Zeitschriften sowie als Dozent für Philosophie und Religion tätig. Über die von ihm betreute Region hinaus ist er als Redner, Prediger, Podiumsteilnehmer, neofuturistischer Action Teacher, Mitglied der Programmgruppe “Erfreuliche Universität Palace” und Held der Schweizer Politgroteske “Der lange Sommer des Bababo” (in Entwicklung) bekannt.

  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • MisterWong
  • Technorati
  • email
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • Twitter
  • Yigg

Chronik | 2 Kommentare »



vistit IIPM



projekte

iipm channel